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Cyberpunk 2077’s easter eggs feel like more marketing

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Jan
30

Cyberpunk 2077’s easter eggs feel like more marketing

There’s a familiar motorcycle available for purchase in Cyberpunk 2077 called the Yaiba Kusanagi CT-3X. You can get it from the fixer Wakako Okada after gaining a street cred level of 12 in the Westbrook district, and it will cost you a hefty 22,000 eddies.

Even from a glance its striking red chassis, the 1988 anime classic Akira can’t help but leap to the mind of anyone familiar with it, yet the Kusanagi is not treated with the same furtiveness that videogames usually afford such references to the real world. It has been plastered over several of the pre-release screenshots and the option to buy it is pushed to your phone, just as with many of Cyberpunk’s original in-universe vehicles. Rather than making a subtle nod to a seminal piece of dystopian anime, CD Projekt Red put it front and centre. This is what most of Cyberpunk 2077’s so-called ‘easter eggs’ are like, and it’s weird.

The use of the term ‘easter egg’ to describe secrets in games was popularised in 1980 by Atari’s Steve Wright, after programmer Warren Robinett hid his own credit in Adventure. Traditionally they’ve been very hard to find, snuck in by developers as either references to things they love or jokes unbeknown to their higher-ups, which means they often share a personal or intimate touch. Many deliberately break the fourth wall and speak directly to players.

RELATED LINKS: Cyberpunk 2077 review, Cyberpunk 2077 lore & universe, Buy Cyberpunk 2077
Source: pcgames

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